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Carrollton is a city in Denton, Dallas and Collin counties in Texas, United States. As of the 2010 census, its population was 119,087, making it the 23rd-most populous city in Texas.

The area was first settled by Jared Ford in 1842 by William and Mary Larner on a site within the Peters Colony grant. In 1844, the A. W. Perry family claimed land in the area around Trinity Mills where, in partnership with Wade H. Witt, a mill was established.

The English colony, a group of families in the northeastern area of settlement which crossed into Denton County, was home to large landowners including the Furneaux, Jackson, Morgan, and Rowe families. It is most likely that Carrollton was named for Carrollton, Illinois, the original home of many of these settlers.

Early on, Carrollton's livelihood was exclusively agricultural, but following the construction of the Dallas-Wichita Railroad through Trinity Mills in 1878, the community began to grow in its industrial significance. Carrollton's significance was further strengthened when the railroad was extended to Denton in 1880 by Jay Gould, who sold the line to the Missouri–Kansas–Texas Railroad (the Katy) in 1881. By 1885, Carrollton had flour mills, cotton gins, two churches, a school, and a population of 150. The St. Louis Southwestern Railway (the "Cotton Belt") crossed the Katy in 1888, and the town became a shipping center for livestock, cotton, cotton seed, and grain, helping the town surpass Trinity Mills to the north.

In 1913 Carrollton was officially incorporated, and W.F. Vinson was elected mayor. A gravel industry that began in Carrollton in 1912 transformed the city, by the late 1940s, to a "grain and gravel" town. The city also supported a brick plant and a dairy industry, and National Metal Products established itself in the city in 1946.

After World War II the city grew rapidly. In 1950 its population stood at 1,610, and it grew to 4,242 in 1960 and 13,855 in 1970. At this point, significant suburban growth began spilling out of north Dallas, and the city grew tremendously between 1970 and 1980, with a documented growth of 193% to 40,595 inhabitants. By 1983, the population was 52,000, by 1990, it had reached 82,169, and by 2010 the population had grown to 119,097.

It is a suburb of Dallas and in 2006 was named to America's "Top 100 Places to Live" by Relocate America. Also in 2006, it was selected as the 19th best place to live in the United States by Money magazine. In 2008 it was named by Money magazine the 15th best place to live among small cities.

In 1996 there was a successful recall election of Carrollton Texas Mayor Gary Blanscet and council members Linda Caldwell, Bernis Francis, Stan Hampton, Bob Novinsky, Bert Colter & Stan Sewell. All were removed from office and replaced by a special election.

Geography
Carrollton, Texas
Climate chart (explanation)
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1.9 5536
2.3 6141
3.1 6949
3.5 7756
5.3 8465
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2.4 9677
2.2 9676
2.7 8969
4.7 7958
2.6 6647
2.5 5739
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: Weather.com / NWS
Metric conversion
According to the United States Census Bureau, Carrollton has a total area of 37.1 square miles (96.1 km2), of which 36.3 square miles (94.0 km2) is land and 0.81 square miles (2.1 km2), or 2.19%, is water.

Carrollton is located in portions of three counties: Dallas County, Denton County, and Collin County.

Climate
On average, the warmest month is July. The highest recorded temperature was 112 °F in 1980. The average coolest month is January. The lowest recorded temperature was 1 °F in 1989. The most precipitation on average occurs in May. Carrollton is considered to have a humid subtropical climate.

Demographics
Historical population
Census Pop. %±
1920 573 —
1930 689 20.2%
1940 921 33.7%
1950 1,610 74.8%
1960 4,242 163.5%
1970 13,855 226.6%
1980 40,595 193.0%
1990 82,169 102.4%
2000 109,576 33.4%
2010 119,097 8.7%
Est. 2019 139,248 16.9%
U.S. Decennial Census
As of the 2010 census, the total population was 119,097, with 43,299 households and 31,073 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,209.8 people per square mile (1,239.3/km2). There were 45,508 housing units at an average density of 1,253.7 per square mile (484.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 63.6% White, 8.4% African American, 0.6% Native American, 13.4% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 10.8% some other race, and 3.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 30.0% of the population.

There were 43,299 households at the 2010 census. Of these, 35.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.8% were headed by married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.2% were non-families. 22.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74, and the average family size was 3.25.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 26.0% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 29.7% from 25 to 44, 27.8% from 45 to 64, and 8.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.6 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.4 males.

At the 2010 census, the median income for a household in the city was $70,960 and the median income for a family was $68,672. The per capita income for the city was $26,746. About 4.1% of families and 5.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.4% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.

Economy
Top Employers (2019)
# Employer # of Employees
1 AmerisourceBergen 1500
2 Halliburton 1000
3 Thomson Reuters 1000
4 Western Extrusions 850
5 Securus Technologies 800
6 AER Manufacturing Inc. 750
7 Baylor Scott & White 640
8 Fairway Mortgage Company 550
9 G6 Hospitality 500
10 Hilton Reservations Worldwide 450
The city houses headquarters for:

FASTSIGNS International, Inc.
Halliburton has North America operations for Easywell in Carrollton.
Heelys, Inc.
Jokari
Motel 6 (G6 Hospitality)
SECURUS Technologies
Woot Inc. (Subsidiary of Amazon)
Government
According to the city's most recent Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (2018), the city's various funds had $150,984,518 in revenue, $151,204,878 in expenditures, $529,903,760 in total assets, $265,901,182 in total liabilities, and $177,408,987 in cash and investments.


Carrollton City Hall
Carrollton is a voluntary member of the North Central Texas Council of Governments association, the purpose of which is to coordinate individual and collective local governments and facilitate regional solutions, eliminate unnecessary duplication, and enable joint decisions.

Carrollton has a city council that consists of seven members and a mayor. The current mayor is Kevin Falconer. The city council is responsible for establishing city policies, considering city resolutions and ordinances, appointing citizens to various city boards and commissions, adopting the city's Comprehensive Plan and annual budget, and approving or rejecting zoning changes. It meets on the first and third Tuesday of every month.

Education

DeWitt Perry Middle School
Most of Carrollton is a part of the Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District. Dallas Independent School District also serves a small portion of Carrollton in the south, along with the Lewisville Independent School District in the north.

CFBISD operates three high schools in Carrollton: Newman Smith High School, R.L. Turner High School, and Creekview High School. Lewisville ISD operates Hebron High School.

The DISD portion is served partially by Jerry R. Junkins Elementary School in Carrollton, Ewell D. Walker Middle School in Dallas, and W. T. White High School in Dallas. Private schools in the area include The Saint Anthony School, Carrollton Christian Academy. At one time Coram Deo Academy had a campus in Carrollton.

The Japanese School of Dallas, a supplementary Japanese school, conducts its classes at Ted Polk Middle School in Carrollton. The school has its main offices in Farmers Branch.

There are three major charter schools in Carrollton. Carrollton Classical Academy, grades K-9, which holds classes at the recently purchased First Baptist Carrollton Josey Campus, Harmony School of Innovation, grades K-8, and Trivium Academy, grades K-8, which holds classes on the campus of First Methodist Carrollton. The 13,000-capacity Tommy Standridge Stadium is located in Carrollton. It is mostly used for high school football and soccer.

Transportation
Carrollton is connected to the Metroplex's highway network by Interstate 35E and the President George Bush Turnpike, as well as the Sam Rayburn Tollway at the far north end of the city.

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport is five miles southwest of Carrollton, and Dallas Love Field is eight miles south.

The Green Line of Dallas Area Rapid Transit's DART Rail system terminates at North Carrollton/Frankford Station and has additional stops within the city limits at Trinity Mills and Downtown Carrollton. Trinity Mills is also the southern terminus of Denton County's A-train, which provides service to Lewisville and Denton. Downtown Carrollton is a planned stop on DART's Silver Line, which is under construction and expected to open in late 2022.

Notable people

Butterfly and wildflowers at Elm Fork Nature Preserve
Carson Blair, former catcher for the Oakland Athletics
David Blough, quarterback for NFL's Cleveland Browns, attended Creekview High School
Amanda Bouldin, New Hampshire politician from Carrollton
Ashley Cain, 2019 U.S. Figure Skating Champion in the pairs discipline
Rafael Cruz, father of U.S. Senator Ted Cruz
Laganja Estranja, drag performer, contestant on RuPaul's Drag Race
Rhema Marvanne, child gospel singer featured in movie Machine Gun Preacher
Jason Maxiell, forward for NBA's Detroit Pistons, attended Newman Smith High School
Katie Meili, Olympic swimmer who won gold and bronze medals at 2016 Summer Olympics.
Keith Moreland, professional baseball player and broadcaster; attended R.L. Turner
Noah Ringer, Taekwondo champion and The Last Airbender actor
Melissa Rycroft, former Dallas Cowboys cheerleader and Dancing with the Stars and The Bachelor contestant
Michelle Beckley, Democratic member of Texas House of Representatives representing the constituents of House District 65 since 2019
Cherami Leigh, actress/voice actress
Taylor Teagarden, catcher for MLB's Baltimore Orioles, attended Creekview High School
Corbin Van Arsdale, former member of Texas House of Representatives from Harris County, 2003-2008; reared in Carrollton; lawyer and lobbyist in Austin
Deron Williams, point guard for NBA's Cleveland Cavaliers, attended Arbor Creek Middle School
Travis Wilson, wide receiver for NFL's Cleveland Browns, attended Creekview High School
Vanilla Ice, rapper and reality TV star; attended R.L. Turner
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